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    University of North Georgia
   
 
  Sep 21, 2017
 
 
    
2013-2014 UNG Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

eCore and Distance Learning


Click on any of the following links for information:

eCore

eCore, the University System of Georgia’s electronic core curriculum, is a convenient and adaptable option for students to take coursework. The core curriculum consists of undergraduate, general education courses primarily required during a student’s first two years of post secondary study. Composed of basic courses in the humanities, physical and social sciences, mathematics, and languages, eCore is fundamental for any four-year degree.

Students take core courses in a fully online format that combines rigor with convenient access on the Desire to Learn platform to include rich interaction with the instructor and fellow students. All eCore courses follow a consistent design to ensure ease of use and reliability. eCore courses are designed, developed, taught and supported by faculty and staff from multiple institutions in the state, including the University of North Georgia.

The eCore courses are taught entirely online, except for the occasional proctored exam and are a great supplement to face to face coursework to keep students on track for a timely graduation. Student support services, including enrollment advisement, bookstore, library services, tutoring, test proctoring and disability services are coordinated through the eCore Administration and the University of North Georgia.

Students should be aware of two major differences from core coursework being offered on campus. Since the program is a collaborative with multiple institutions, eCore follows a separate calendar that may or may not coincide with the University of North Georgia. Also, there are fees associated with taking online courses. Students enrolling in only online courses are exempt from mandatory student fees, with the exception of the technology and institution fees.

Students are most likely to succeed in eCore when they:

  • have reliable access to an Internet-connected computer.
  • know how to navigate web sites, manage email, work with files, and do other basic computer tasks.
  • can organize their own time to complete assignments and meet deadlines.
  • participate actively in online discussions.
  • are comfortable asking for help or clarification when needed.
  • are prepared to work as hard online as they would in a face-to-face class.

eCore Courses

Course Descriptions

PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I
CHEM 1211K

Description:
First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: High school chemistry course with laboratory or introductory college chemistry course with laboratory. College algebra. Precalculus as a prerequisite or co-requisite is highly recommended.

Learning Objectives:
Matter and Measurement - Identify states of matter. Distinguish between elements, compounds, mixtures, and identify and use the SI system of units. Atoms, Molecules, and Ions - Calculate average atomic masses, and distinguish between molecular and ionic compounds. Stoichiometry - Write and balance chemical equations and perform calculations with Chemical Formulas and Equations. Calculate molecular weights of compounds and inter-convert masses and moles. Aqueous Reactions - Determine if a precipitate will form, and write molecular total ionic and net ionic equations. Carry out calculations based on titrations. Thermochemistry - Determine enthalpies of reaction using Hess’s Law, and determine enthalpies of reaction using tabulated enthalpies of formation. Gases - Apply gas laws (Boyle’s, Charles’ and Avogadro’s). Correlate rates of effusion with molar masses, using Graham’s Law of effusion. Electronic Structure of Atoms - Describe Bohr’s model of the hydrogen atom. Write the electron configurations of many-electron atoms. Periodic Properties - Recognize how the chemical properties of an element relate to its position on the periodic table. Chemical Bonding - Write Lewis structures for molecules and ions, and recognize the need for resonance structures. Determine the plausibility of structures using formal charges and polarity of bonds. Molecular Geometries - Understand the concepts of orbital overlap and valence-bond theory, and construct hybrid orbitals.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess)
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
Chemistry laboratory materials (Commonly found household items that may be purchased at local retailer for about $30). A lab kit comprised of laboratory equipment and glassware. See http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php for further information.

PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II
CHEM 1212K

Description:
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: CHEM 1211K College algebra. Precalculus as a prerequisite or co-requisite is highly recommended.

Learning Objectives:
Intermolecular Forces, Liquids and Solids - Identify types of intermolecular forces, namely, ion-ion, ion-dipole, dipole-dipole, London forces, hydrogen bonds, and properties of liquids such as viscosity and surface tension. Construct and interpret phase diagrams. Properties of Solutions - Calculate the solubility of a solution. Describe the effects of pressure and temperature on solutions. Calculate an unknown molecular weight of a solute using colligative properties. Chemical Kinetics - Determine the order with respect to each reactant, based on experimental data. Calculate concentrations as a function of time from integrated rate laws. Chemical Equilibrium - Solve for equilibrium concentrations when given the initial concentrations of reactants and equilibrium constant. Determine the effect of changing reaction conditions such as pressure, volume, concentration, and temperature on a chemical equilibrium. Acid-Base Equilibrium - Solve for equilibrium concentrations of acids and bases given the initial concentrations of reactants and equilibrium constant. Additional Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria - Prepare a buffer solution and calculate the pH. Calculate solubility equilibria and predict precipitation. Chemical Thermodynamics - State and appropriately apply in problems the first, second and third laws of thermodynamics. Determine change in enthalpy, entropy and free energy for a chemical reaction. Electrochemistry - Balance redox equations by the “half-reaction” method. Determine cell potentials under non-standard conditions using the Nernst equation.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess)
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
Chemistry laboratory materials (Commonly found household items that may be purchased at local retailer for about $30.). A lab kit comprised of laboratory equipment and glassware. See http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php for further information.

HUMAN COMMUNICATION
COMM 1100

Description:
This course is a broad approach to oral communication skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public speaking. Students in this course will be expected to participate in discussions on a frequent basis, take 12 short online quizzes, complete a variety of unit assignments and take a proctored final exam.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Identify and describe the basic components of the communication model, the various types of communication, the role communication plays to satisfy needs, and the difference between communication and communications (information technology, satellite engineering, etc.). Utilize critical thinking skills to create communicative appeals that are coherent and well adapted to the receiver, stylistically appropriate, and substantively complex. Describe the different ways in which language defines and frames situations. Recognize how different language strategies (such as the use of vivid, evasive, and equivocal language) enhance or undermine communication effectiveness. Describe and analyze the basic strategies for reducing communication anxiety. Identify, analyze, and discuss common listening habits that interfere with effective communication and strategies for improving listening skills. Analyze the fundamental dimensions of cultural diversity (demographic, regional, and ideological) as they relate to communication. Discuss the ethical aspects of communication. Identify and explain the major theories of human communication and persuasion in interpersonal, small group, and public communication contexts. Observe, explain, and apply the major concepts used to describe interpersonal processes, including the evolution of the self-concept, relational development, listening, and conflict management. Observe, explain, and apply the major concepts used to describe small group processes, including group characteristics, decision making, roles, and norms of interaction. Observe and utilize the recommended strategies for developing and delivering and evaluating effective public presentations.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
Access to a webcam with microphone, video camera, or computer with camera preinstalled (such as a MacBook or iMac) and headset (headphone and mic), or microphone and speakers are required.

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I
ENGL 1101

Description:
Composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: All ESL students must have exited from all ESL courses. All remedial students must have completed all reading and writing required remediation.

Learning Objectives:
Write complete, properly developed sentences using correct standard English grammar. Understand common errors in writing and how to avoid them. Write unified paragraphs with a clear topic and central point. Write a narrative essay. Use a reading process to understand how other writers organize their writing. Know key components of the writing process. Plan writing in light of situation, audience, and purpose. Follow a format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation. Write an essay that informs or explains. Proofread and edit your writing. Develop an effective thesis statement. Structure an argumentative paper. Offer supporting evidence for your argument. Write effective introductory and concluding paragraphs. Successfully review the writing of a peer. Write a comparison and contrast essay. Incorporate in your writing information and ideas from outside sources. Use MLA documentation. Use Galileo and search engines to locate source information on the Web. Critically evaluate Internet research resources. Assess various Web-based source materials. Write an analytical paper assessing electronic research resources. Follow a format and procedure to produce a research paper. Use GALILEO and search engines to locate articles. Develop a working bibliography. Critically evaluate researched sources and assess varied viewpoints. Integrate pertinent information from outside sources. Synthesize information and ideas from outside sources. Compose an argumentative essay based on research.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.
ENGLISH COMPOSITION II
ENGL 1102

Description:
A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101 that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: C or better in ENGL 1101. Completed ENGL 1101 within the past five years. Passed the home institution’s computer literacy requirements.

Learning Objectives:
Learn more about writing academic discourse. Plan and conduct a research project using a variety of research sources. Practice and continue to develop critical thinking skills in writing and reading assignments. Navigate and communicate effectively online.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

WORLD LITERATURE I
ENGL 2111

Description:
A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102.

Learning Objectives:
Extend reading, writing, and critical thinking skills developed in ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102. Develop a perspective on the variety of world cultures from ancient times through the early-modern period to understand how these cultures developed and how their ideas contributed to and still inform contemporary culture(s). Recognize the range of literary genres and conventions as well as the levels of sophistication of literary masterpieces coming from different cultures. Analyze and evaluate literary works in their social, historical, and cultural context. Compare and contrast the characteristics of literary works emerging from various cultures and times in order to recognize common human values and beliefs. Investigate the effect literature as a technology has had on the history of ideas and aesthetics. Engage technology and media effectively in the learning process. Participate as an effective member in a collaborative online community.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

AMERICAN LITERATURE II
ENGL 2132

Description:
This course will present a broad overview of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Students will utilize various critical approaches and reading strategies as they examine important authors and themes of this period. The course will pay special attention to multiple cultures and perspectives. Some of the authors that will be included in this course are Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, Mark Twain, Langston Hughes, Kate Chopin, Maxine Hong, Robert Frost, and Raymond Carver.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102.

Learning Objectives:
Identify and apply a variety of critical approaches to literature. Identify the important literary periods and themes of American Literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Demonstrate knowledge of a diversity of American cultures through the study of literature. Apply various reading strategies to text in order to summarize, synthesize, analyze, interpret, and evaluate the literature. Write a paper on a topic in American literature using MLA style and a variety of sources that shows original thought, research, and an ability to assimilate and synthesize the ideas of others on the topic. Enhance technological skills.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY IN THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT
ETEC 1101

Description:
This course is an introduction to using personal computers to communicate with individuals and organizations and to access, store, and analyze information. Emphasis is on exploring the role of technology in present and future learning experiences. Topics include the digital divide, virtual communities, telecommuting, job search and readiness, e-commerce, globalization, privacy versus security, and intellectual property in cyberspace. Students will use their practical technology skills to create word-processed documents, an electronic presentation, and a Web page.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: Beginning level skill in Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Exited Learning Support in Reading and English.

Learning Objectives:
Become effective users of technology. Develop an understanding of the social implications of emerging technologies. Utilize electronic technologies to conduct research. Critically evaluate the quality and relevance of Internet-based information resources. Select appropriate technologies and methods to compile, analyze, organize, and present relevant information effectively. Recognize the role of technology in lifelong learning.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
Microsoft Office Suite’s Word and PowerPoint. Quick Source Guides for Microsoft Word and PowerPoint.

INTRODUCTORY GEOSCIENCES I
GEOL 1011K

Description:
This course covers Earth materials and processes.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Identify Earth materials and discuss/interpret their origin, economic uses, compositions, and interrelationships. Uses maps, photos and diagrams to identify and interpret topographic and geologic structures and the processes which form them. Demonstrate knowledge of Earth surface processes and their impact on mankind. Discuss evidence of plate tectonics and the Earth’s internal structure and how processes within the Earth influence Earth’s major surface features, control their location; and control the location of earthquakes and volcanic activity. Demonstrate knowledge of the perspective of geologic time as related to geologic events and processes and the formation of Earth materials.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
For a list of the required lab materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

WORLD HISTORY I
HIST 1111


Description:
A survey of world history to early modern times. Students in this course will be expected to participate frequently in class discussions, take 12 unit quizzes, and proctored midterm and final exams.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Explain the importance of geography and how geography can impact historical events, issues, and processes. Read, interpret and effectively use maps, including the interactive maps in this course, to answer historical questions. Identify and evaluate the important historical political, cultural, social and economic movements, historical figures, and events that characterize the development of the great world civilizations from antiquity through the 1500 C.E. Explain the ways in which history is both an art and a science. Analyze various interpretations of world historical events, figures, and issues and explain the ways and the reasons why these interpretations have changed over time. Demonstrate an awareness of the relationship of events across cultures, and chronologically order historical events both in the context of the culture in which they occurred as well as in the context of global civilizations. Write well-developed and logically organized analytical essays. Demonstrate critical thinking skills in reading and writing assignments, including the ability to analyze, synthesize, and interpret primary and secondary sources. Distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and analyze at least five major issues using appropriate sources and historical methodology. Identify at least three other types of resources besides written records that historians may use to study the past and explain their use to enlighten historical questions using at least three different issues. Identify the major historiographical issues associated with the significant time periods, cultures, figures, and events from antiquity through 1500 C.E. Identify the major centers of world civilization and their most important characteristics in Europe, the Near and Far East, Africa and the Americas from antiquity through 1500 C.E. Identify, using at least three examples, the ways in which world civilizations and cultures interacted with and influenced one and another from antiquity through 1500 C.E.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

UNITED STATES HISTORY I
HIST 2111

Description:
A survey of U.S. History to the post-Civil War period. The course focuses on the geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people, and places U.S. events in the context of world politics. (This course satisfies the State legislative requirement concerning United States history and Georgia history.)

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Identify and evaluate the major controversies, issues, personalities, problems and trends in U.S. history up to 1865. Evaluate trends and issues in intellectual and cultural history and be able to relate them to topics in U.S. History. Determine the relationship between local and national issues and events. Place issues and events of U.S. History in a global context. Analyze the trials and contributions of the many cultures that make up American society. Recognize the role of diversity in American society. Exhibit a comprehension of the historical process of continuity and change. Appraise how and why the historical interpretations of the controversies, issues, personalities, and problems have changed over time. Analyze the extent to which historical and contemporary American society has embraced the ideals of the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Constitutional periods. Describe the ways geography has impacted historical processes. Read and interpret maps. Develop critical thinking, collaborative, and organizational skills. Undertake research using a variety of materials. Differentiate between primary and secondary sources. Analyze, synthesize, and interpret primary and secondary sources and clearly communicate results using a variety of media. Formulate a convincing historical argument using primary and secondary sources.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
ENVS 2202

Description:
This course is an interdisciplinary course integrating principles from biology, chemistry, ecology, geology, and non-science disciplines as related to the interactions of humans and their environment. Issues of local, regional, and global concern will be used to help students explain scientific concepts and analyze practical solutions to complex environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on the study of ecosystems, human population growth, energy, pollution, and other environmental issues and important environmental regulations.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Describe Environmental Science and the basic concepts involved in the study of the subject. Identify various ecosystems. Describe various ecosystem components and functions and their impact on the environment. Discuss human population by calculating human population growth and identifying the impact of such growth on the environment. Describe various sources of energy from several perspectives: their origins, costs, and environmental impact. Identify various pollutants to our air, water, and land and discuss their environmental impact. Interpret environmental issues affecting the Earth and its populations, including water use, food production, and urban development. Define biodiversity and identify its value. Identify the need for environmental regulations. Explain the balance between the implementation costs of environmental regulations and their impact on humankind.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL MODELING
MATH 1101

Description:
This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communications of quantitative concepts and results.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Understand the concept and basic properties of functions. Understand the concept and basic properties of linear functions. Understand the concept and basic properties of quadratic functions. Understand the concept and basic properties of polynomials. Understand the concept and properties of exponential functions. Understand the concept and basic properties of logarithms. Understand the concept and basic properties of matrices. Understand the concept and basic properties of piecewise-defined functions.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
TI-83 or TI-84 calculator with GraphLink cabling/software OR TI-83 PLUS or TI-84 PLUS.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA
MATH 1111

Description:
This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions and their graphs. This includes linear, quadratic, piece-wide defined, inequalities, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Model situations from a variety of settings in generalized mathematical forms. Express and manipulate mathematical information, concepts, and thoughts in verbal/numeric/graphical/symbolic form while solving a variety of problems. Solve multiple-step problems through different (inductive, deductive and symbolic) modes of reasoning. Properly use appropriate technology in the evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information in problem-solving situations. Shift among the verbal, numeric, graphical, and symbolic modes of considering relationships. Extract quantitative data from a given situation, translate the data into information in various modes, evaluate the information, abstract essential information, make logical deductions, and arrive at reasonable conclusions.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
TI-83 or TI-84 calculator with GraphLink cabling/software OR TI-83 PLUS or TI-84 PLUS.

PRE-CALCULUS
MATH 1113

Description:
This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry and trigonometry.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: Math 1101- Mathmatical Modeling or Math 1111 - College Algebra.

Learning Objectives:
After completing this course the student will be able to: Identify the characteristics of various functions such as: definition of a function domain and range; average rate of change; algebraic combinations; composition; inverse functions. Sketch and analyze the graphs of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions. Set up and solve word problems using algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions. Solve equations using algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic trigonometric identities and formulas. Demonstrate knowledge of basic properties of logarithmic and exponentials functions. Analyze when the use of technology is appropriate and when to apply the technology.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
TI-83 or TI-84 calculator with GraphLink cabling/software OR TI-83 PLUS or TI-84 PLUS.

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
MATH 1401

Description:
The course is a course in basic statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, hypothesis testing, inferences, correlation, and regression.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: Math 1101 Mathematical Modeling, 1111 College Algebra, or 1113 Precalculus or approved equivalent.

Learning Objectives:
Identify and apply appropriate methods of data collection. Effectively communicate quantitative concepts and results. Use graphical and numeric techniques to describe data. Develop an understanding of the concept of probability and the relationship of probability and statistics. Develop an understanding of the various probability distributions. Use the appropriate method for estimating values of population parameters. Use the appropriate method to test population parameters. Use appropriate technology to determine whether a linear relationship exists between two variables. Extract quantitative data from a given situation, translate the data, evaluate information, abstract essential information, make logical deductions, and arrive at reasonable conclusions.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
TI-83 or TI-84 calculator with GraphLink cabling/software OR TI-83 PLUS or TI-84 PLUS.

CALCULUS I
MATH 1501

Description:
Topics to include functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, antidifferentiation, the definite integral, and applications.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: Math 1113 - Pre-calculus or its equivalent.

Learning Objectives:
Unit 1: Review of Functions and their Properties. Describe the domain, range, and action of a one variable function. Understand various ways of describing functions and various properties that a function can have such as odd, even, or monotone. Compute sums, differences, products, quotients, and compositions of functions. Compute translations, reflections, and scalings of curves and graphs of functions. Compute trigonometric functions and understand their definitions. Solve triangles. Unit 2: Limits and Continuity. Calculate and evaluate limits and represent these concepts graphically, algebraically, numerically and in words. Apply knowledge of limits and continuity to analyze and solve real-world problems. Determine when the use of technology is appropriate in solving problems related to limits and continuity, and how to apply the technology. Unit 3: Derivatives and Differentiation. Explain the definition of derivative and how it is related to tangent lines and rates of change, and to compute derivatives from the limit definition. Compute derivatives using all of the standard rules, displaying in particular a strong mastery of the chain rule. Compute derivatives of trigonometric functions and compute closely related trigonometric limits. Explain the concept of an implicitly defined function, and use the technique of implicit differentiation to differentiate functions that are defined implicitly. Model and solve related rates problems. Unit 4: Applications of the Derivative. Solve problems related to rates of change. Identify and describe properties of functions and their graphs. Apply the properties of functions and their graphs to real life problem situations. Unit 5: Integration. Calculate anti-derivatives by using some basic rules. Evaluate anti-derivatives using the substitution technique. Define the definite integral. Evaluate a few definite integrals using the definition as a limit of Riemann sums. State the fundamental theorem of calculus. Apply the fundamental theorem of calculus to evaluate definite integral. Unit 6: Applications of the Integral. Define and compute the arc length. Compute the area of surfaces of revolutions. Compute volumes of revolution. Compute consumer’s surplus. Compute work and center of mass problems

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
TI-83 or TI-84 calculator with GraphLink cabling/software OR TI-83 PLUS or TI-84 PLUS.

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
PHIL 2010

Description:
Introduction to the central issues, questions, and theories of Western Philosophy. Topics covered include logic and critical thinking; religion; knowledge and skepticism; philosophy of mind; freedom and determinism; and ethics. Students are expected to engage in philosophical discussion based on primary and secondary texts.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Explain, justify, and criticize major positions in central areas of philosophical inquiry as follows: Think, argue, and write clearly and cogently about philosophical issues. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the key concepts of logic and critical thinking. Engage in philosophical discourse by offering and effectively responding to arguments.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php. 

PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS I
PHYS 1211K

Description:
An introductory course which will include material from mechanics, thermodynamics and waves. Elementary differential calculus will be used. This course has a laboratory component that requires a lab kit.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: Completion of Calculus I (differentiate, integrate, simple functions).

Learning Objectives:
Understand and apply the laws and concepts associated with physics by solving word problems. Perform simple laboratories and reach appropriate conclusions. Write clear, concise laboratory reports. Represent data graphically by hand and computer.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

Technical Requirements: (EnrollSpecial)
Physics Laboratory Materials (Commonly found household items that may be purchased at local retailer for under $20.).
Microsoft Excel will be used for graphing data in this course.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
POLS 1101

Description:
A study of government and politics, including the philosophical and constitutional foundations, governing institutions, political behavior and major public policy issues. (This course satisfies the State legislative requirement concerning the United States Constitution and the Georgia Constitution).

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate a knowledge of the historical background, foundations, origins, content, and application of the U. S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Demonstrate a knowledge of the Georgia Constitution. Identify the Institutions and processes of the three branches of government. Develop an awareness of current political issues and the policy making process, both domestic and global. Analyze the nature of Democratic politics in terms of political behavior (e.g. ideology, public opinion) and linking institutions (e.g. parties, interest groups, media). Demonstrate an understanding of the cause and effect relationships in society. Recognize differing perspectives and points of view. Construct and analyze arguments.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 1101

Description:
A broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing behavior, development, learning, memory, and personality.

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Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Apply course content to everyday life – making better decisions; enhancing relationships; increasing self-understanding. Recognize that human experience and behavior vary as a function of context, culture and situation. Identify, understand and contrast fundamental psychology perspectives within an historical context; past, present and future trajectory. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of the major methods of scientific inquiry. Understand the relation among mind, body, consciousness, behavior. Relate the importance of objectivity in scientific inquiry to the inherently subjective nature of human experience.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 1101

Description:
A survey of the discipline of sociology. Topics will include sociological theory, methods and selected substantive area.

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Prerequisites: none.

Learning Objectives:
Compare, contrast, and apply the basic theoretical paradigms of sociology (Structural-Functional, Social-Conflict, and Symbolic-Interaction) and analyze two or more phenomena in society using the three perspectives. Identify and define the steps of the research process and evaluate claims (made in the research literature or by the media) in terms of validity, reliability, appropriate research methodology, and practical application. Define, identify, and explain culture, socialization, social interaction, groups, and social organization as basic building blocks of society and social experience and to apply this knowledge to explain why people conform to or deviate from societal expectations. Explain social stratification using theoretical perspectives to analyze economic, racial/ethnic, and gender inequality in a societal context. Explain social structure, provide examples of social structure (both at the macro and micro level), and to be able to express how important social institutions (such as family, religion, education, medicine, and others) shape society and social experience. Identify and interpret the impact of basic demographic trends in society and discuss mechanisms of social change.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I
SPAN 2001

Description:
A rapid review of grammar with continued use of listening, speaking, and reading and writing skills, all with a cultural emphasis.

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Prerequisites: SPAN 1002 or equivalent.

Learning Objectives:
Students successfully completing Spanish 2001 should be able to comprehend oral and written forms and to communicate on a variety of topics in Spanish. To achieve this level of communication, students must be able to negotiate Spanish in all major time frames, and must possess the grammatical and cultural skills to function in basic daily situations, to give short descriptions of objects, people, and places, to express feelings, and to present a simple opinion. Students should demonstrate an understanding of their languages and cultures in relation to the practices, products, and perspectives of the culture(s) of Spanish speaking countries. Students should reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through Spanish. Students should show evidence of enrichment through an authentic experience in Spanish.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II
SPAN 2002

Description:
Listening, speaking, and reading and writing skills in an introduction to literature and within a cultural context.

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php

Prerequisite: SPAN 2001 or equivalent.

Learning Objectives:
Students successfully completing Spanish 2002 should be able to comprehend oral and written forms and to communicate on a variety of topics in Spanish. To achieve this level of communication, students must be able to negotiate Spanish in all major time frames, and must possess the grammatical and cultural skills to function in basic daily situations, to give short descriptions of objects, people, and places, to express feelings, and to present a simple opinion. Students should demonstrate an understanding of their languages and cultures in relation to the practices, products, and perspectives of the culture(s) of Spanish speaking countries. Students should reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through Spanish. Students should show evidence of enrichment through an authentic experience in Spanish.

Required Materials (EnrollAccess):
For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.
 

Additional eCore Information

For additional course information, visit http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/description.php.

For a list of required materials, visit the eCore Courses Textbook page at http://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

For additional information regarding technical requirements, visit https://ecore.usg.edu/courses/textbooks.php.

 

Support for Distance Learners

Distance learning is an online learning environment entirely accessed by your computer, with an Internet connection. Course work is conducted through electronic forums, discussion groups, external resources, quizzes, virtual rooms, and online submitted assignments. Aiding in your success you are given an email account, web collaboration tools, and personal storage space networked drive accessible both on campus and through the university’s virtual private network. We provide a variety of academic support services online, through our websites.

Online Student services include: Academic Advising, Career Services, Counseling & Psychological Services, Distance Education & Technology Integration, Financial Aid, Information Technology Services, Learning Support, Multicultural Services, New Student Orientation Program, Online Library Services, Student Success Program, Testing Office, Tutoring, Student Disability Resources, and Student Life Services.